FANDOM


Below is a list of all SEGA systems released.

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Console Release Date Discontinuation Dates Generation Notes Picture
SG-1000 July 15 1983 July 1984 Third
  • Sega's first home console, created in an attempt to transition from the arcade game industry
  • Also known as the Sega Game 1000
  • Played ROM cartridges
  • Computer version with a built-in keyboard which played Sega Card games released as the SC-3000
  • Not commercially successful, due to the number of consoles on the market already and *the release of the Famicom by Nintendo on the same day
SG-1000
SG-1000 II July 1984 October 1985 Third
  • Upgraded version of the SG-1000 with detachable controllers
  • Could play Sega Card games in addition to ROM cartridges
  • Computer version with a built-in keyboard which only played Sega Card games released as the SC-3000H
SG-1000 II
Master System JP: October 1985

NA: 1986
EU: 1987

JP: 1989

NA: 1992
EU: 1996

Third
  • Sega's second major home console, released worldwide
  • Initially released in Japan as the Sega Mark III, the third version of the SG-1000, before being redesigned and rebranded as the Master System
  • Played both Sega Card games and ROM cartridges
  • Smaller and cheaper version of the console named the Master System II was released in 1990; it only played ROM cartridges and sold poorly
  • Unsuccessfully competed with the Nintendo Famicom in Japan and North America, but was successful in Europe
  • Still for sale in Brazil
Master System
Sega Genesis JP: October 29, 1988

NA: August 14, 1989
EU: November 30, 1990

1997 Fourth
  • Sega's third major home console, after the SG-1000 and Master System, released worldwide
  • Named the Mega Drive outside of the United States
  • Played ROM cartridges
  • A computer with an integrated Mega Drive was released in Japan as the Sega TeraDrive in 1991
  • A smaller, lighter version of the console named the Genesis II was released in 1993
  • Handheld version of the console named the Sega Nomad that played the same cartridges released in 1995; an early version for use on Japanese airplanes was named the Mega Je
  • The Sega Meganet internet service in Japan with the Mega Modem peripheral provided downloadable titles, some exclusive to the service, starting in 1990; it was replaced with the similar Sega Channel service in 1993
  • Although the system was officially discontinued in 1997, third-party variants have been released around the world as recently as 2009
  • Outsold by its main competitors Nintendo's Super Famicom and NEC's PC Engine in Japan, but was the highest seller of the generation in some other regions, such as the United States
Sega Genesis
Game Gear JP: October 6, 1990

NA: April 26, 1991
EU: April 26, 199

JP: 1996

NA/EU: April 30, 1997

Fourth
  • Handheld game console version of the Master System, though it could not play Master *System games without a Master System Converter accessory
  • Played ROM cartridges
  • Commercially successful, though it was outsold by its primary competitor, the Nintendo Game Boy
Sega Game Gear
SEGA CD JP: December 12, 1991

NA: October 15, 1992
EU: 1993

1996 Fourth
  • Add-on device for the Sega Genesis with its own exclusive library
  • Added CD-ROM support as well as additional processing power
  • Second version named the Sega CD 2 was released in 1993 to correspond with the second version of the Sega Genesis
  • Portable combination of the Sega Genesis and Sega CD named the Sega Genesis CDX in the United States and the Sega Multi-Mega elsewhere released in 1994
  • Sold poorly compared to the Sega Genesis itself
SEGA CD
Sega Pico JP: June 26, 1993

NA: November 1994
EU: 1994

JP: April 5, 2005

NA: February 1998
EU: 1997

Fourth
  • Video game console aimed at young children, released worldwide
  • Named the Kids Computer Pico in Japan
  • Played ROM cartridges shaped like books
  • Controlled via a stylus and a graphics tablet, but did not have its own screen
  • Sold very well in Japan but poorly elsewhere
SEGA Pico
Sega 32x JP: December 3, 1994

NA: November 21, 1994
EU: January 1995

1996 Fourth
  • Add-on for the Sega Genesis with its own exclusive library
  • Added additional processing power and support for 32-bit games to the 16-bit Genesis
  • Played different ROM cartridges from the Sega Genesis itself
  • Combination release of the Sega Genesis and the Sega 32X named the Sega Neptune was planned for release in late 1995, but was delayed and then cancelled when the 32X was discontinued
  • Considered a commercial failure
SEGA 32x
Sega Saturn JP: November 22, 1994

NA: May 11, 1995
EU: July 8, 1995

1998 Fifth
  • Sega's fourth major home console and only release in the 32-bit console generation, released worldwide
  • Played CD-ROM games
  • Released simultaneously with the Sega 32X, which also played 32-bit games
  • Sega NetLink accessory, released in 1996, provided internet and multiplayer gaming access; in Japan it used the SegaNet internet service
  • Second version of the console with a built-in NetLink component codenamed Sega Pluto was planned but never released
  • Considered a commercial failure; sold significantly fewer copies than its competitors the Sony PlayStation and Nintendo 64
Sega Saturn
Dreamcast JP: November 27, 1998

NA: September 9, 1999
EU: October 14, 1999

March 30, 2001 Sixth
  • Sega's fifth and final major home console and only major release in the sixth console generation, released worldwide
  • Played CD-ROM games
  • Included a built-in modem, which could connect to the SegaNet internet service in Japan and North America and the Dreamarena service in Europe
  • VMU accessory served as a combination memory card, second screen, and simple handheld console
  • Considered a commercial failure; sold significantly fewer copies than its main competitor the Sony PlayStation 2 due to a poor Japanese launch and lack of DVD support
Dreamcast
Advanced Pico Beena JP: August 6, 2005 N/A Sixth
  • Video game console aimed at young children, released only in Japan
  • Successor to the 1993 Sega Pico
  • Plays ROM cartridges shaped like books
  • Still being produced
Advanced Pico Beena

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.